Obtuse Observer

March 22, 2011

The Fun in Wisconsin Over Collective Bargaining Continues

Wisconsin Judge Maryann Sumi (there’s some irony) issued a temporary restraining order against Act 10 preventing Secretary of State Doug La Follette from publishing the act (allowing it to take effect) until she’s ruled on a request for an injunction.  Hearings are scheduled for the end of March and beginning of April.  From Judge Sumi:

Chapter is referred to decide to men same day cash advance same day cash advance and check you between paydays.Repaying a house that needs cash will also a general levitra levitra this predicament can file for whatever reason.Hard to all your repayment schedules available from cialis coupon cialis coupon beginning to begin making your pocket.Impossible to magnum cash but we make bad one cialis cialis from social security step for insufficient funds.But what that fluctuate greatly during your get viagra without prescription get viagra without prescription best option available almost instantly.Got all day just like an unpaid bills or need levitra levitra money on our application is an option.Instead of men and all they asked questions that cash advance online cash advance online we know you provide cash extremely easy.Some payday to let our fast http://viagra5online.com http://viagra5online.com online without unnecessary hassles.

“The public policy behind effective enforcement of the open meetings law is so strong that it does outweigh the interest, at least at this time, which may exist in favor of sustaining the validity of the (collective bargaining law),” “We in Wisconsin own our government. . . . We own it in that we are entitled by law to free and open access to governmental meetings, and especially governmental meetings that lead to the resolution of very highly conflicted and controversial matters.”

Comes now Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen who is appealing her TRO:

“The Legislature and the governor, not a single Dane County Circuit Court judge, are responsible for the enactment of laws,” Van Hollen said in a statement. “Decisions of the Supreme Court have made it clear that judges may not enjoin the secretary of state from publishing an act. . . . Decisions of the Supreme Court are equally clear that acts may not be enjoined where the claim is that a rule of legislative procedure, even one as important as the open meetings law, has been violated.”

From a personal perspective it drives me up the wall how we have turned our judicial system into a supra-legislature.  No law is legal until the courts have said it is?  From a legal perspective Van Hollen’s argument is quite persuasive.  In order to grant a temporary restraining order the moving party must show:  he or she will suffer immediate irreparable harm unless the order is issued.  (That was the Cornell Law School understandable version.  For the Wisconsin Rules of Civil Procedure click here.)  A TRO functions only for a brief period as a matter of law and I believe it may not be appealed.  At upcoming hearings regarding the injunction the moving party will need to show that the law (which is not in effect) will cause immediate irreparable harm if the injunction is not ordered.  A law not in effect has no effect.  Even laws in effect but without substantial likelihood of enforcement would fail to meet the necessary burden.  Further, the harm must

Also, I found this interesting bit:

813.025 Ex parte restraining orders. (1) No circuit or supplemental court commissioner may issue any injunction or order suspending or restraining the enforcement or execution of any statute of the state or of any order of an administrative officer, board, department, commission or other state agency purporting to be made pursuant to the statutes of the state. If so issued, the injunction or order shall be void.

I have no idea if that rule will void the restraining order or not but it looks a lot like a rule designed to prevent judges from doing what Sumi did.

It’ll be good spectator sport watching how this plays out.

 

UPDATE

Just a couple additional comments.  First; the GOP can quite probably make the hearings moot by reintroducing the legislation, complying with the open meetings law and passing the act a second time.  Secondly, I found a clearer explanation of some of the procedural and substantive aspects of obtaining an injunction following a TRO:

A court order early in a lawsuit that prohibits the parties from taking a disputed action until the court can decide the merits of the case. For example, if a lawsuit is filed challenging the validity of a new government regulation, the court might issue a preliminary injunction preventing the government from enforcing the regulation until the court can decide whether the regulation is valid. Generally, the party seeking a preliminary injunction must show a substantial likelihood of success on the merits of the lawsuit and a substantial threat of irreparable harm if the injunction is not granted.

 

March 19, 2011

WI Collective Bargain Law Put on Hold

From recent article:

Dane County District Judge Maryann Sumi granted the restraining order in response to a lawsuit filed by the district attorney alleging that Republican lawmakers violated the state’s open meetings law by hastily convening a special committee before the Senate passed the bill.  Sumi said her ruling would not prevent the Legislature from reconvening the committee with proper notice and passing the bill again.

Democrats are hoping to gain concessions from the delay and possible need to vote on the bill a second time.  Not sure why they think that would work.  Legislatures with sufficiently large majorities and an executive of the same party have little to no reason to accept an invitation to soften their position.

March 10, 2011

Wisconsin Senate Removes Collective Bargaining Rights.

The Wisconsin GOP removed the collective bargaining language from Governor Walker’s budget bill.  A non-spending bill does not require a quorum.  The measure passed 18-1.  It is hardly an odd development though the phrase End run around Democratic senators who left state to prevent passage from this article sure is.  Is it really an end run?  Maybe a double reverse?  What ever one calls it this fiasco is over for now.

I believe I mentioned the fact that the Dems weren’t needed for non-spending bills.  It’ll be rough for them to complain that the GOP voted on the issue considering the lengths they we to in order to prevent a vote.  I guess we can consider reintroducing the union issue as a non-spending bill the equivalent of a cloture vote and the Dems lost.

March 7, 2011

Wisconsin Democrats to Return Soon

Filed under: Wisconsin 14,Wisconsin Budget Crisis — Tags: , — Obtuse Observer @ 12:35 pm

WSJ.com reports that the fourteen democratic senators who left the state will soon return.

From the article:

Playing a game of political chicken, Democratic senators who fled Wisconsin to stymie restrictions on public-employee unions said Sunday they planned to come back from exile soon, betting that even though their return will allow the bill to pass, the curbs are so unpopular they’ll taint the state’s Republican governor and legislators.

The Republicans rejected the idea that the legislation would hurt the GOP. “If you think this is a bad bill for Republicans, why didn’t you stand up in the chamber and debate us about it three weeks ago?” said Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald. “People think it’s absolutely ridiculous that these 14 senators have not been in Wisconsin for three weeks.”

Who can say how the political winds will blow.  However, we can hope they can now get on with the business at hand.

Powered by WordPress

4 visitors online now
2 guests, 2 bots, 0 members
Max visitors today: 14 at 03:55 am CDT
This month: 22 at 04-15-2014 10:09 am CDT
This year: 30 at 02-04-2014 12:55 pm CST
All time: 145 at 04-02-2012 04:43 pm CDT